the-SWOT-Analysis-Marketing-Plan

For each of the four parts of the SWOT Analysis, at least four factors are required; however, more may be needed depending on the product or service. Part of the grade will depend on how well the critical SWOT factors are addressed. Bullets may be used, but grammar, punctuation, and spelling will count. Submit the Marketing Plan: SWOT Analysis to the Assignment box no later than Sunday 11:59 PM EST/EDT of Module 3. (This Assignment box maybe linked to Turnitin.) Criteria A B C D F Punctuality On time. 10% for each day. 10% for each day. 10% for each day. 10% for each day. Grammar One-point deduction for each error in APA, grammar, spelling, or punctuation. One-point deduction for each error in APA, grammar, spelling, or punctuation. One-point deduction for each error in APA, grammar, spelling, or punctuation. One-point deduction for each error in APA, grammar, spelling, or punctuation. One-point deduction for each error in APA, grammar, spelling, or punctuation. Length Full points for meeting the length requirement. 10-point deduction for 75%. 30-point deduction for 50%. 40-point deduction for 25%. 50-point deduction for less than 25%. Content Full points for fully meeting the content requirements. 10-point deduction for 75%. 20-point deduction for 50%. 30-point deduction for 25%. 40 points and up for missing content beyond 25% of what is required

MKT 301 Marketing Plan: SWOT Analysis Example This is a SWOT analysis for a fictitious firm based near our campus called University Express. It provides a shuttle service between the campus and area night spots on Thursday through Saturday evenings. It is new, and is owned and operated by graduates of the University. INTERNAL Strengths Weaknesses Increases student safety Limited experience of management team Provides economical transportation Low capital reserves High demand among students High liability Parental support Driver unreliability Perceived as being “green” In each of the cases above, the firm has some, and in many cases a good deal, of control over the issue. EXTERNAL Opportunities Threats DUI laws motivate students to not drive Low barrier to entry Parents concerned about students driving Students prefer flexibility of their own cars Peer pressure to party on weekends Limited student budgets No one wants to be “designated driver” High-volume traffic conditions in targeted areas are unpredictable, impacting promised schedules Law enforcement DUI task forces (roadblocks, special patrols) Student perception of the service (it’s not cool, inconvenient) Bar/club liability For each of the cases above, the firm has little control regarding the issue; however, the firm can still respond to the issue.