Reflective-Journal-Who-Am-I-The-Journey-Begins

Reflective Journal: Who Am I?—The Journey Begins

You have been learning that diversity manifests itself at the personal level through a unique set of social identities. It follows that examining who you are and the diverse social identities you represent, establishes a strong starting point for your study of diversity. If you cultivate a deep level understanding of who you are and how you became who you are, you are also more likely to understand and respect other people’s individual diversity.

This assignment marks the beginning of crafting your “Diversity Profile.” Throughout the course, this assignment will provide you with opportunities to add new insights and ideas to your profile, based on your learning and increasingly complex understanding of diversity. As you progress, your “Diversity Profile” will grow, change, and—as part of a life-long process—represent more authentically your personal complexity and diversity.

Begin crafting your “Diversity Profile” by following these steps:

  • Watch the web video “War/No More Trouble” by “Playing for Change.”
  • Read and reflect on the accompanying text below the web video (you may need to expand the description).
  • Review the excerpt from Ramsey’s Teaching and Learning in a Diverse World and Deaux’s article “Social Identity.

Title the Assignment: Diversity Profile—Week 1 and complete in the following way:

Part 1: Who Am I?

  • Using the social identities list in the article “Social Identity,” write down the social identities that apply to you. If you “own” additional social identities which are not included in this article, make sure to include them in your list.
  • Beginning with the phrase, “I am…” and based on the social identities you just wrote, compose a list of at least 10 words or phrases that complete the sentence and represent some or all your social identities.

Remember that this list is for your benefit only and does not have to conform to anyone else’s perceptions about you. If possible, move beyond the obvious and dig deep, asking yourself sincerely: Who am I?

Part 2: What Are My Goals for This Course?

  • Write down three specific professional goals you have at this point for your study of diversity (e.g., what changes in yourself you expect or hope for and/or what professional benefits you expect).

Submit your Diversity Profile, Parts 1 and 2.

Resources:

Web Video: Playing for Change: “War/No More Trouble” (approximate length: 5 minutes)

If this video is unavailable, choose the next one from the list below, etc. (Feel free to watch all of them.)

  • Web Video: Playing for Change: “War/No More Trouble” (alternate site)
  • Web Video: Playing for Change: “Imagine” (approximate length: 4 minutes)
  • Web Video: Bob Marley: “War/No More Trouble” (approximate length: 8 minutes)
  • Web Video: Playing for Change: “One Love” (approximate length: 5 minutes)
  • Web Video: Playing for Change: “Equal Rights” (approximate length: 3 minutes)
  • Book Excerpt: Ramsey, P. G. (2004). Teaching and learning in a diverse world (pp. 3–6). New York, NY: Teachers College Press.
    Copyright 2004 by Teachers College Press. Reprinted by permission of Teachers College Press via the Copyright Clearance Center.
  • Article: Deaux, K. (2001). Social identity. In J. Worell (Ed.), Encyclopedia of women and gender (Vols. 1–2, pp. 1–9). Maryland Heights, MO: Academic Press.
    Copyright 2001 by Elsevier Science & Technology Books. Reprinted by permission of Elsevier Science & Technology Books via the Copyright Clearance Center.